Book Contents

Contents

Book – Part 1

Introduction   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    15

Part 1 Chapter 1

Misconceptions about Counting Calories and Weight Control  . . . .  17

Misconceptions about Energy Balance and

Weight Gain/Weight Loss   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   27

Part 1 Chapter 2

Food, Water, Air, Physical Activity

and Weight Gain/Weight Loss   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   33

Part 1 Chapter 3

Underlying Mechanism of Body Fat Distribution     . . . . . . . . . . .   45

Part 1, Chapter 4

Geographical Environment and Obesity   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49

The Man Made Environment and Obesity   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  50

Part 1, Chapter 5

Modern Sitting Furniture and Obesity Epidemic   . . . . . . .  53

The Shape of Modern Upholstered Sitting Furniture and

Abdominal Weight Gain    . . . . . . . . . . .  59

Biomechanics of Sitting on a Firm Seat and on a Soft Seat   . . . . . . 67

Sitting Posture and Modern Style of Upholstered Sitting Furniture   . . .72

Biomechanics of Sitting and the Sense of Balance   . . .. . . 78

Skeletal Muscles and Body Posture in a Sitting Position   . . . . .  82

Sitting Posture and the Biological Basis of Weight Gain/Weight Loss   .  . 87

Sitting Posture and Mechanical Stimulations   . .  .  94

Weight Loss Surgeries, Weight Loss, Diabetes and the Biomechanics of Sitting and Walking    .. . .    97

Industrialized World Diseases and Modern Sitting Furniture     . . .   110

Couch, Sofa, Armchair and Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes … 114

The Way to Counteract to the Adverse Consequences

of Prolong Sitting   . . . . . . . . .. . 116

Part 1 Chapter 6

Post Pregnancy Weight Loss   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .   119

Hollywood Story – Weight Gain, Weigh Loss   . . . . . . . . . . . . .   121

The Long Neck Women   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 124

Excessive Skin – Saggy Fat Tissues . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 125

Gynecomastia   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

Book – Part 2 

Postural and Motor Skill Exercises

Introduction    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..   133

Part 2, Chapter 1

Walking   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  138

Habitually Walk  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .    142

Slow Walk   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   145

Extreme Slow Walk     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   147

Walking With Folded Arms in Front of the Chest     . . . . . . .   150

Brisk Walk     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .   154

Part 2, Chapter 2

Changing the Speed and the Direction of the Walk   . . . . . . . .  157

Walking Up and Down a Hill     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   163

Walking Diagonally Up and Down a Hill       . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

Balanced Walking – Advanced Level     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   173

Walking Over Rocky Ground      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   178

Part 2, Chapter 3

Standing on One Leg     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 181

Bare Foot Exercises      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186

Part 2, Chapter 4

Stretching the Body in

the Direction Opposite to the Pull of Gravity    . . . . . . . . . . . . .   190

Pushing an Object in the Direction Opposite to

the Pull of Gravity   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  194

Part 2, Chapter 5

Balanced Stretching Exercises    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . .   198

Balanced Stretching Exercises – Advanced Level     . . . . . . . . .   201

Part 2, Chapter 6

Jumping   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   204

Height Jump – Vertical Jump    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    207

Distance Jump    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    210

Height and Distance Jump   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    212

Jump in the Height to Catch, Grab or Touch an Object   . . . . . .   215

Jumping Up a Slope   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   218

Jumping Down a Slope   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     221

Part 2, Chapter 7

Jumping and Landing Skills – Advanced Level   . . . . . . . . . . . . .   224

Landing Skill – Advanced Level    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  228

Part 2, Chapter 8

Weight Carrying Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   232

Extremely Balanced Walking While Carrying a Weight   . . . . . . . 236

Part 2, Chapter 9

Summary about Weight Loss    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   241

About Pseudoscience of Weight Gain and Weight Loss

Weight loss treatment involving dieting, increased physical activity, diet pills and bariatric surgeries was invented when obesity scientists believed that every single calories in food intake if not spent will be stored as fat mass in fat tissue. Those believe was in line with the anabolism and catabolism theories. At those times, the theory “calories in – calories out” was unquestioned scientific dogma.

A few years back, it was realized that a significant amount of food intake lives in the body as metabolic waste; feces, urine, sweat, breathe etc. (Significant and variable amount of the energy in food intake human body doesn’t use but excretes mainly through the digestive and urinary system.)There was a little confusion among people involved in research, prevention and treatments of obesity, but another theory was quickly invented. It was a “calories in – calories out over a prolonged period of time”. This theory is widely known as “the energy balance”.

In 2007 I havedebunked the “energy balance paradigm”.

Since early 2010, “The Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO)”, theUnited Kingdoms foremost organisation dedicated to the understanding and treatment of obesity, has removed from their website everything that mentioned calories in – calories out and the energy balance. Up to date of 30 March 2011 on “The web site of the Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO)” there is noting about calories or “energy balance”. The ASO used to run the ORIC, the Obesity Resource and Information Centre. The ORICdisappeared from the internet in the early of 2010.

The UK Government’s Foresight Report ‘Tackling Obesities: Future Choices’, in 2007, 2008 and 2009 involving around 100 obesity scientists, was based on the “Energy Balance Paradigm”. It appears that all ForesightUK work related to the problem of obesity was not only fruitless, but it was also misleading.

It seems that since early 2010, Foresight UK doesn’t do any work on the obesity problem.

It appears that the “calories in – calories out” and the “energy balance paradigm” as a basis of understanding obesity have been abandoned byUK obesity researchers.